Caravan Rear Bar Storage – Maximise Your Caravans Storage

Caravan Rear Bar Storage – Maximise Your Caravans Storage

Caravan Rear Bar Storage – Maximise Your Caravans Storage

Discover how caravan rear bar storage enhances organisation and convenience for your travel adventures. Free up space and stay organised! Are you tired of cramming all your gear into your caravan leaving little room to move? Do you dream of a more organised and spacious travel experience? Look no further than your caravan’s rear bar! In this comprehensive guide, we consider everything you need to know about caravan rear bar storage from its benefits to practical tips for maximising space. Let’s dive in and discover how you can enhance your caravan adventures with smart storage solutions.

Introduction: Unlocking Hidden Storage

Imagine having extra space to store all your camping essentials without cluttering your caravan’s interior. That’s where caravan rear bar storage comes in handy. By utilising the space at the rear of your caravan, you can free up valuable room inside. While keeping your gear easily accessible during your travels. From storage boxes to bike racks there are loads of options available to suit your needs and preferences. Let’s explore the benefits and practicalities of caravan rear bar storage in more detail.

Benefits Of Rear Bar Storage

  1. Maximising Storage Space: With rear bar storage, you can make the most of every inch of available space on your caravan. By mounting storage boxes or racks to the rear bar you can store bulky items. Items such as camping chairs, fishing gear, and outdoor equipment. Leaving more room inside for living and sleeping areas.
  2. Easy Access to Gear: Rear bar storage provides quick and convenient access to your gear. Saving you time and effort when setting up camp or embarking on outdoor activities. No more digging through crowded storage compartments. With rear bar storage everything you need is right at your fingertips.

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Spare Tyre Mount (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Spare Tyre Mount (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

Types of Caravan Rear Bar Storage Solutions

  • Storage Boxes: Durable and weather-resistant storage boxes are a popular choice for caravan rear bar storage. Available in various sizes and designs, these boxes provide secure storage for tools, spare parts, and other essentials. Look for models with locking mechanisms to keep your belongings safe during travel.
  • Bike Racks: If you enjoy cycling adventures, a bike rack mounted to the rear bar of your caravan is a must-have accessory. These racks allow you to transport bicycles safely and securely, freeing up interior space for other items. Choose a rack that is compatible with your caravan’s rear bar and easy to install and use.

Installation And Maintenance Tips

  1. Installation: When installing rear bar storage solutions, follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully to ensure proper installation and safe use. Use sturdy mounting brackets and hardware to secure storage boxes and racks to the rear bar. Regularly check for signs of wear and tear.
  2. Maintenance: To keep your rear bar storage system in top condition inspect storage boxes, bike racks and mounting hardware regularly. Check for any signs of damage or corrosion. Clean storage boxes and racks regularly to remove dirt, dust, and debris, and lubricate moving parts as needed for smooth operation.

Caravan Rear Bar Jerry Can Storage

Caravan rear bar jerry can storage is a convenient solution for carrying extra fuel or water on your travels. Jerry cans are sturdy containers designed to hold liquids such as petrol, diesel, or water. They can be securely attached to the rear bar of your caravan for easy access when needed. Here’s everything you need to know about caravan rear bar jerry can storage:

Benefits Of Caravan Rear Bar Jerry Can Storage

  • Extended Range: By carrying extra fuel in jerry cans on your caravan’s rear bar, you can extend your range and travel further between refuelling stops. This is especially useful when exploring remote areas or embarking on long journeys.
  • Emergency Preparedness: Having extra water stored in jerry cans on your caravan’s rear bar ensures that you always have access to clean drinking water. Even in emergencies or when camping in areas with limited water sources.
  • Convenience: Caravan rear bar jerry can storage provides a convenient way to carry extra fuel or water without taking up valuable space inside your caravan. This frees up room for other essentials and allows for more comfortable living and sleeping arrangements.

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Mounted Tool Box (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Mounted Tool Box (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

Types of Jerry Cans

  • Fuel Jerry Cans: Designed specifically for carrying petrol or diesel. Fuel jerry cans are typically made of durable metal or plastic and feature secure closures to prevent leaks and spills. They come in various sizes and capacities to suit your needs.
  • Water Jerry Cans: Water jerry cans are specifically designed for carrying potable water and are made from food-grade materials to ensure water safety. They are available in different sizes and colours, with built-in handles for easy carrying and pouring.

Installation And Safety Considerations

  • Secure Mounting: When installing jerry can holders on your caravan’s rear bar, ensure that they are securely mounted using sturdy brackets or straps. This prevents the jerry cans from shifting or falling off during travel. Reducing the risk of accidents or spills.
  • Weight Distribution: Distribute the weight of the jerry cans evenly on your caravan’s rear bar to maintain stability and towing performance. Avoid overloading the rear bar with too many jerry cans, as this can affect the handling of your caravan.
  • Ventilation: Ensure adequate ventilation around the jerry cans to prevent the build up of fumes and reduce the risk of fire or explosion. Avoid storing jerry cans containing fuel near heat sources or open flames.

Maintenance And Care

Regular Inspection: Inspect jerry cans regularly for signs of damage, corrosion, or leakage. Replace any damaged or worn-out jerry cans to ensure safe storage of fuel or water during your travels.

Cleaning: Clean jerry cans thoroughly before filling them with fuel or water to remove any dirt, debris, or residue. Use mild detergent and water to wash the inside and outside of the jerry cans, and allow them to dry completely before use.

Caravan rear bar jerry can storage is a practical and convenient solution for carrying extra fuel or water on your travels. By choosing high-quality jerry cans and securely mounting them to your caravan’s rear bar, you can extend your range, enhance your emergency preparedness, and enjoy greater convenience on your adventures. Just remember to follow safety guidelines and perform regular maintenance to ensure safe and reliable storage of fuel or water during your travels.

Caravan Rear Bar Spare Tyre Storage

Caravan rear bar spare tyre storage offers a convenient solution for carrying an extra tire while on the road. It ensures that you’re prepared for unexpected flat tires or emergencies without sacrificing valuable space inside your caravan. Here’s everything you need to know about caravan rear bar spare tyre storage.

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Jerry Can Holders (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

DS Custom Toolboxes Rear Bar Jerry Can Holders (Photo Courtesy Of DS Custom Toolboxes)

Benefits Of Caravan Rear Bar Spare Tyre Storage

  1. Emergency Preparedness: Having a spare tyre readily accessible on your caravan’s rear bar ensures that you’re prepared for unexpected flat tires or blowouts during your travels. It provides peace of mind knowing that you can quickly replace a damaged tire and continue your journey with minimal disruption.
  2. Space Saving: Caravan rear bar spare tyre storage frees up valuable space inside your caravan by relocating the spare tyre to the exterior. This allows you to utilise interior space more efficiently for living and storage areas, making your travels more comfortable and organised.
  3. Convenience: With the spare tyre mounted securely on the rear bar of your caravan, it’s easily accessible whenever you need it. There’s no need to rummage through storage compartments or struggle to access the spare tyre stored in a separate location.

Types Of Spare Tyre Storage Solutions

1. Spare Tyre Mounts: These are specially designed brackets or carriers that securely hold the spare tyre in place on the rear bar of your caravan. They come in various styles and configurations to accommodate different tyre sizes and caravan models.

2. Spare Tyre Covers: To protect the spare tyre from the elements and keep it in good condition, consider using a spare tyre cover. These covers come in a range of materials and designs, including waterproof vinyl and durable canvas, and help prolong the life of the spare tyre.

Installation And Safety Considerations For Spare Tyre Storage Solutions

  1. Secure Mounting: When installing a spare tyre mount on your caravan’s rear bar ensure that it is securely attached using sturdy bolts or straps. The mount should be positioned in a way that distributes the weight of the spare tyre evenly and prevents it from shifting or falling off during travel.
  2. Weight Capacity: Check the weight capacity of the spare tyre mount to ensure that it can safely support the weight of your caravan’s spare tyre. Avoid overloading the mount with a tyre that exceeds its maximum weight capacity to prevent damage or failure.
  3. Visibility and Accessibility: Ensure that the spare tyre is mounted in a location that does not obstruct the visibility of rear lights, licence plates or registration stickers. Additionally, make sure that the spare tyre is easily accessible for quick removal and replacement when needed.

Maintenance And Care

  1. Regular Inspection: Inspect the spare tyre mount and spare tyre regularly for signs of damage, corrosion, or wear. Check for loose bolts, rust, or cracks in the mount, and replace any worn or damaged components as needed to ensure safe and reliable storage of the spare tyre.
  2. Tyre Pressure: Monitor the air pressure in the spare tyre regularly to ensure that it is properly inflated and ready for use in case of an emergency. Underinflated or overinflated tyres can affect handling and performance, so maintain the recommended air pressure levels at all times.

Caravan rear bar spare tyre storage is a practical and convenient solution for carrying an extra tyre on your travels. By securely mounting the spare tyre on the rear bar of your caravan, you can ensure that you’re prepared for unexpected flat tyres or emergencies while maximising interior space and convenience. Just remember to follow installation guidelines, perform regular maintenance, and keep the spare tyre properly inflated to ensure safe and reliable storage during your adventures.

Popular Accessories For Caravan Rear Bar Storage

  • Cargo Nets: Flexible cargo nets are ideal for organising and securing gear on your caravan’s rear bar. Stretch them over storage boxes or bike racks to keep items in place during travel, preventing them from shifting or falling off.
  • Tie-Down Straps: Strong tie-down straps are essential for securing larger items such as camping chairs, coolers, and kayaks to your caravan’s rear bar. Choose straps with adjustable lengths and sturdy buckles for maximum security and peace of mind on the road.

Caravan rear bar storage offers a practical and efficient solution for maximising storage space and organising gear during your travels. By utilising the space at the rear of your caravan, you can free up valuable room inside while keeping your belongings easily accessible. Whether you opt for storage boxes, bike racks, or a combination of both, rear bar storage can help you make the most of your caravan adventures. So, why wait? Start exploring the possibilities of rear bar storage and enjoy a more organised and enjoyable travel experience today!

Caravan With A Bike Rack On Rear Bar (Photo Courtesy Of Beastie Bikes)

Caravan With A Bike Rack On Rear Bar (Photo Courtesy Of Beastie Bikes)

What Else Can I Carry On My Caravan Rear Bar Storage Area?

On your caravan’s rear bar, you can carry a variety of items to enhance your outdoor adventures and make your travels more convenient. Here are some common items that can be safely and securely transported on a caravan rear bar:

  • Storage Boxes: Durable and weather-resistant storage boxes are perfect for carrying camping essentials such as cooking equipment, tools, spare parts, and outdoor gear. Choose boxes with secure locking mechanisms to keep your belongings safe during travel.
  • Bike Racks: If you enjoy cycling, a bike rack mounted to the rear bar of your caravan allows you to transport bicycles securely. This frees up interior space for other items while ensuring that your bikes are easily accessible when you reach your destination.
  • Kayak or Canoe: For water enthusiasts, a kayak or canoe can be securely attached to the rear bar of your caravan using specialised racks or straps. This allows you to bring your watercraft along on your adventures and explore lakes, rivers, and coastal areas.
  • Camping Chairs and Tables: Folding camping chairs and tables can be strapped to the rear bar of your caravan, providing comfortable seating and dining options at your campsite. Look for lightweight and compact chairs and tables that are easy to transport and set up.
  • Outdoor Equipment: From fishing rods and tackle boxes to hiking poles and backpacks, outdoor equipment can be securely stored on the rear bar of your caravan using straps or bungee cords. This keeps your gear organised and easily accessible for outdoor activities.
  • Cooler or Esky: A portable cooler or esky can be strapped to the rear bar of your caravan to keep food and beverages cold during your travels. This allows you to enjoy refreshing drinks and chilled snacks wherever your adventures take you.
  • Surfboard or SUP: If you’re headed to the beach, a surfboard or stand-up paddleboard (SUP) can be safely transported on the rear bar of your caravan using specialised racks or straps. This allows you to catch some waves and enjoy water sports during your trip.
  • Luggage and Gear: For longer journeys, luggage and gear can be strapped to the rear bar of your caravan to free up space inside. This includes suitcases, duffel bags, and backpacks containing clothing, toiletries, and personal belongings.

Remember to secure all items properly using straps, bungee cords, or specialised racks to prevent them from shifting or falling off during travel. Additionally be mindful of weight limits and distribution to ensure safe and stable towing of your caravan. With careful planning your caravan’s rear bar can become a versatile convenient storage solution for all your outdoor adventures.

Safety Considerations

Ensuring safety is paramount when it comes to caravan rear bar usage. Here’s a guide to caravan rear bar safety.

  1. Proper Installation
    • Ensure that the rear bar is installed correctly according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
    • Use sturdy mounting brackets or straps to secure the rear bar to the caravan frame.
    • Double-check all connections and fasteners to ensure they are tight and secure before each journey.
  2. Weight Distribution
    • Be mindful of the weight capacity of the rear bar and avoid overloading it with heavy items.
    • Distribute weight evenly across the rear bar to maintain stability and prevent swaying or imbalance during travel.
    • Consider the weight of items stored on the rear bar, including storage boxes, spare tyres, or jerry cans. Ensure they are within the recommended limits.
  3. Visibility
    • Ensure that the rear bar and any items mounted on it do not obstruct the visibility of rear lights, indicators, or licence plates.
    • Use reflective tape or markers to improve visibility of the rear bar, especially when travelling at night or in low-light conditions.
  4. Clearance
    • Check for adequate clearance between the rear bar and the ground, especially when navigating rough terrain or steep inclines.
    •  Avoid dragging or scraping the rear bar on uneven surfaces to prevent damage to both the rear bar and the caravan.
  5. Regular Inspections
    • Perform regular visual inspections of the rear bar to check for signs of wear, damage, or corrosion.
    • Pay special attention to mounting brackets, fasteners, and welds, and replace any worn or damaged components immediately.
    • Inspect any items mounted on the rear bar, such as storage boxes or spare tyres. Ensure they are securely attached and in good condition.
  6. Driving Considerations
    • Be mindful of the increased length and weight of the caravan with items mounted on the rear bar, especially when reversing or parking.
    • Allow for extra braking distance and take corners slowly to compensate for the additional weight and potential changes in handling.
    • Check rearward visibility using mirrors or a rear view camera system to monitor any items mounted on the rear bar while driving.
  7. Weather Conditions
    • Consider the impact of weather conditions, such as strong winds or heavy rain, on the stability and safety of the rear bar.
    • Securely fasten any loose items or covers to prevent them from becoming dislodged or causing a hazard to other road users.

By following these safety guidelines and practising responsible usage, you can ensure that your caravan rear bar enhances your travel experience while prioritising safety for you, your passengers, and other road users. Remember, safety always comes first when it comes to caravan accessories like rear bars.

Caravan Rear Bar Storage Great Setup (Photo Courtesy Of RV Daily)

Caravan Rear Bar Storage Great Setup (Photo Courtesy Of RV Daily)

Caravan Rear Bar Storage Weight Limits

  • The weight limit of a caravan rear bar varies depending on its design, construction, and the manufacturer’s specifications. As a general guideline, most caravan rear bars have a weight capacity ranging from 50 kilograms to 150 kilograms.
  • It’s crucial to adhere to the specified weight limit to ensure the safety and stability of your caravan while towing. Exceeding the weight limit can lead to issues such as instability, swaying, or even structural damage to the caravan or rear bar.
  • Before loading any items onto your caravan rear bar, including storage boxes, spare tyres, or other accessories, check the manufacturer’s documentation or consult with a professional to determine the weight capacity of your specific rear bar model.
  • When loading items onto the rear bar, distribute the weight evenly to prevent imbalance and ensure proper towing performance. Avoid overloading the rear bar with heavy items, and periodically check for signs of wear or damage to the rear bar and mounting hardware.
  • By adhering to the weight limit and practising responsible loading practices, you can ensure the safety and longevity of your caravan rear bar while enjoying your travels with peace of mind.

Frequently Asked Questions About Caravan Rear Bar Storage

How much weight can a caravan rear bar typically support?

Most caravan rear bars can support anywhere from 50 kilograms to 150 kilograms, depending on their design and construction.

Are there any specific safety considerations to keep in mind when using caravan rear bar storage?

Yes, it's essential to ensure proper installation, weight distribution, and regular maintenance to minimise the risk of accidents or damage.

Can I use caravan rear bar storage to carry a spare tire?

While some rear bar storage solutions include provisions for spare tire storage, it's essential to check compatibility and weight limits before attempting to carry a spare tire.

How do I install jerry can holders on my caravan's rear bar?

Follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully, using sturdy mounting brackets or straps to secure the holders to the rear bar.

What types of liquids can I store in jerry cans attached to my caravan's rear bar?

Jerry cans are suitable for carrying liquids such as petrol, diesel, or water, depending on their intended use and construction materials.

Is it safe to store jerry cans containing fuel on the rear bar of my caravan?

Yes, but it's essential to follow safety guidelines, including proper ventilation and secure mounting, to prevent the risk of fire or explosion.

Summary

Caravan rear bar storage offers a practical and efficient solution for maximising storage space and organizing gear during your travels. By utilising the space at the rear of your caravan you can free up valuable room inside while keeping your belongings easily accessible. Whether you opt for storage boxes, bike racks, or a combination of both rear bar storage can help you make the most of your caravan adventures. Start exploring the possibilities of rear bar storage and enjoy a more organized and enjoyable travel experience today!

Comprehensive Caravan Diesel Heater Troubleshooting Guide

Comprehensive Caravan Diesel Heater Troubleshooting Guide

Comprehensive Caravan Diesel Heater Troubleshooting Guide

Resolve caravan diesel heater issues fast with our troubleshooting guide. Don’t let malfunctions disrupt your travel plans. Experiencing problems with your caravan diesel heater can be bloody frustrating – after all you just want to keep warm! Whether you’re gearing up for a cross-country adventure or simply looking to stay warm on a weekend getaway, a malfunctioning caravan diesel heater can put a damper on your plans. That’s why we’ve created this comprehensive troubleshooting guide to help you identify and resolve common problems with your caravan diesel heater quickly and efficiently.

Understanding Your Caravan Diesel Heater

Before diving into troubleshooting it’s essential to have a basic understanding of how your caravan diesel heater works. These heaters operate by burning diesel fuel to generate heat which is then circulated throughout your caravan via a series of ducts and vents. While they are generally reliable and efficient, like any mechanical system they can experience issues from time to time.

Installed Heater

Installed Heater

Troubleshooting Chinese Diesel Heater Problems

Fuel Troubleshooting

  • Clear Fuel Line: Ensure the fuel line is free from obstructions like air bubbles or cracks.
  • Air Purge: It may take several start-ups to purge air from the line completely.
  • Fuel Flow: Confirm fuel delivery to the heater unit.
  • Diesel Gel Prevention: Prevent diesel gelling in low temperatures by using quality fuel filters.
  • Resetting: For E-10 errors, reset the heater by removing and reinserting the fuse.

Power Troubleshooting

  • Inverter and Voltage: Utilize a minimum 150-watt inverter and ensure at least 12.5 volts of power.
  • Battery Check: Verify battery charge levels.
  • Wiring Inspection: Ensure proper wiring connections, especially if extended wiring is involved.
  • Glow Plug and Sensor: Check the glow plug and consider sensor replacement if necessary.

Air & Exhaust Troubleshooting

  • Blockage Detection: Remove exhaust and air inlet pipes to detect blockages.
  • Pipe Cleaning: Clean or replace obstructed pipes and mufflers.

Blown Fuses

  • Fuse Replacement: Replace blown fuses promptly.
  • Glow Plug Inspection: Replace the glow plug if causing short circuits.
  • Fan Check: Ensure the fan is functioning properly to prevent overloading.

Diesel Heater Control Screen And Module

Diesel Heater Control Screen And Module

Chinese Diesel Heater Blowing Smoke

Is your heater emitting smoke? Follow these steps for troubleshooting:

  • Blockage Check: Inspect air inlet, exhaust pipe, and muffler for blockages.
  • Fuel Level: Top up fuel if white smoke indicates insufficient ignition fuel.
  • Exhaust Pipe Length: Restore original exhaust pipe length to optimize performance.

Diesel Heater Error Code Table

ERROR
CODE
ISSUESOLUTION
E-01Undervoltage of power supply – battery doesn’t have enough power• Recharge your battery before turning the diesel heater back on
• Check heater is set to correct voltage (12 or 24) in advanced settings
E-02Overvoltage of power supply – voltage is over the permitted level• Reduce the voltage to 12 volts
• Check heater is set to correct voltage (12 or 24) in advanced settings
E-03Glow plug fault – ignition plug failure• Check glow plug and leads (replace if necessary)
• Possibly low voltage
E-04Fuel pump fault – fuel pump broken/ not working• Check the fuel pump’s getting power
• Check all fuel lines are intact
• Check there’s enough fuel in the tank
• Possibly low voltage
E-05Overheating of the machine• Check air intake isn’t blocked
• Check all vents are unblocked
• Check fan is working correctly
• Check that ducting hasn’t been crushed
• Check the temperature sensor on the housing
E-06Motor fault – fan motor issue• Check that the fan is turning freely
• Possibly low voltage
• Check the magnet polarity and Holzer sensor position
(see video below)
E-07Broken circuit fault – communication broken between the heater and controller• Check all plugs and connections
• Possibly low voltage
E-08Flame out – low fuel or air in fuel lines• Check fuel levels in fuel tank
• Check fuel filter is full
• Check for blockages in fuel supply
• Check all fuel connections are good
• Possibly low voltage
• May need to restart multiple times to refill fuel
E-09Sensor fault• Check sensor plug isn’t loose/ broken
• Check the circuit
E-10Ignition failure• Check lines & pump for blockages
• Check fuel supply
• Indicates multiple restarts without success (due to other errors)

Common Error Codes

Error Code E-01: Ignition Failure

If you’re seeing error code E-01 on your caravan diesel heater it indicates an ignition failure. This could be caused by a variety of factors, including a dirty or faulty ignition electrode, a clogged fuel line, or insufficient fuel supply. To troubleshoot this issue, start by checking the ignition electrode for any signs of dirt or corrosion. If necessary clean the electrode with a soft brush or replace it altogether. Next, inspect the fuel line for any obstructions and ensure that an adequate supply of diesel fuel is reaching the heater.

Error Code E-02: Overheating

Error code E-02 indicates that your caravan diesel heater is overheating. This can be a serious issue that poses a fire risk if not addressed promptly. The most common cause of overheating is a blocked air intake or exhaust vent, which restricts airflow and prevents proper heat dissipation. To remedy this problem, carefully inspect both the air intake and exhaust vents for any obstructions, such as debris or insect nests. Clear away any blockages and ensure that the vents are free to allow airflow.

Typical Chinese Diesel Heater

Typical Chinese Diesel Heater

Error Code E-03: Fuel Pump Failure

If your caravan diesel heater is displaying error code E-03, it points to a failure of the fuel pump. This can occur due to a variety of reasons, including a clogged fuel filter, a malfunctioning fuel pump motor, or an electrical issue. Start by checking the fuel filter for any signs of contamination or blockage. If the filter appears dirty or clogged, replace it with a new one. Next, test the fuel pump motor to ensure that it is receiving power and functioning correctly. If necessary, consult the manufacturer’s manual for troubleshooting steps specific to your model of heater.

Additional Troubleshooting Tips

In addition to the common error codes mentioned above, there are several other troubleshooting steps you can take to address issues with your caravan diesel heater:

  • Check the Thermostat: Ensure that the thermostat is set to the desired temperature and functioning properly. If the thermostat is faulty, it may not accurately control the heater’s operation.
  • Inspect the Wiring: Examine the wiring connections for any signs of damage or corrosion. Loose or damaged wires can prevent the heater from receiving power or communicating with the control panel.
  • Verify Fuel Quality: Use high-quality diesel fuel to prevent issues such as clogs or contamination in the fuel system. Avoid using old or contaminated fuel, as this can lead to performance problems.
  • Clean the Exhaust Pipe: Periodically inspect and clean the exhaust pipe to remove any build-up of soot or debris. A clear exhaust ensures proper ventilation and helps prevents carbon monoxide build-up inside your caravan.

Conclusion

Encountering issues with your caravan diesel heater can be frustrating. However with the right troubleshooting steps, you can quickly diagnose and resolve common problems. By familiarising yourself with error codes, inspecting key components, and performing routine maintenance you can keep your heater running smoothly and enjoy a comfortable travel experience. If you have problems that can’t be resolved through troubleshooting contact a qualified technician for help. By following these guidelines, you can efficiently diagnose and resolve common issues, ensuring optimal performance and longevity for your diesel heater.

List Of Australian Caravan Brands

Adventura Caravans, Alpha Fibreglass, Aussie Wide Caravans, Avan Campers, Ballina Campervans, Billabong Custom Caravans, Caravan Manufacturer, Caria Caravan Trailer, Challenge Camper Trailers Caravans, Classic RTM Caravans, Concept Caravans, Coromal Caravans, Creative Caravans, Davsher Caravans, Desert Edge Trailers, Designer Vans Caravans, Discoverer Campers, Dreamhaven Caravans, Dreamland Trailers, Driftaway Caravans, Dryden Trailers Caravans, Eagle Caravans, Elross Caravans, Evernew Caravans, Exodus Campers, Ezytrail Campers, Galaxy Caravans, Goldstream Recreational Vehicles, Golf Caravans, Heaslip Campers, Horizon Motorhomes, I & D Industries, Imperial Caravans, Jayco Caravans, Jurgens Caravans, Kea Campers Australia Caravans, Kingdom Caravans, La Vista Caravans, Lifestyle Leisure RV, Limit Seeker Camper Trailers Caravans, Lotus Caravans, Majestic Caravans, MARS Campers, May West Caravans, Millard RV Caravans, Montana Caravans, Nova Caravans, Olympic Caravans, Opalite Caravans, Paradise Caravans, Paradise Motor Homes, Paramount Caravans, Regal Caravans, Regent Caravans, Retreat Caravans, Rhinomax, Rivenlee Caravans, Roma Caravans, Royal Flair Caravans, Spaceland Industries Caravans, Spinifex Caravans, Suncamper Caravans, Sunland Caravans, Sunliner Recreational Vehicles, Supreme Caravans, Swagman Aust Caravans, Tavlor Motorhomes, Toy Haulers Manufacturer, Track Trailer, Trailblazers RV Caravans, Trailer Manufacturer, Trailstar Caravans, Trakka Caravans, Trakmaster Caravans, Travelhome, Traveller Caravans, Truelux 5th Wheel, Vanguard Caravans, Western Caravans, Windsor Caravans, Winnebago Industries, Wirraway Motorhomes, Zone RV

Using Caravan Levelling Ramps With The eLam Level App

Using Caravan Levelling Ramps With The eLam Level App

Using Caravan Levelling Ramps With The eLam Level App

The essential guide to caravan levelling ramps and getting level fast. How to use and benefit from these indispensable tools for stability. Caravan levelling ramps used in conjunction with the awesome Elam Level app make it fast and simple to get your caravan level first time every time.

Introduction to Caravan Levelling Ramps

Caravan levelling ramps are a must-have accessory for your caravan. Caravan levelling ramps play a crucial role in ensuring stability and safety when parking your caravan on uneven ground. In this guide we’ll explore everything you need to know about caravan levelling ramps, from their importance to tips for choosing and using them effectively.

Caravan Levelling Ramps Dual Axle Caravan

Caravan Levelling Ramps Dual Axle Caravan

Importance of Using Caravan Levelling Ramps

  1. Ensure Stability: Levelling ramps help to keep your caravan level on uneven ground, preventing uncomfortable tilting and swaying.
  2. Prevent Damage: Parking on uneven surfaces without levelling ramps can put undue stress on your caravan’s frame and suspension, leading to potential damage over time.
  3. Enhance Comfort: A level caravan means you won’t roll out of bed in the middle of the night and you peas won’t all end up on one side of your dinner plate! By levelling your caravan, you create a more comfortable living environment inside.
  4. 3 Way Fridge Operation: It’s crucial to effective operation of your 3 way fridge that your caravan is both level and stable. If your caravan level is out of whack then your 3 way fridge won’t work. Level caravan equals cold beer.

Types of Caravan Levelling Ramps

  1. Single Axle Levelling Ramps: Designed for caravans with a single axle, these ramps offer ease of use and portability. They are ideal for smaller caravans and provide adequate support on most terrains.
  2. Double Axle Levelling Ramps: Suitable for caravans with dual axles, these ramps offer increased stability and support across a wider surface area. They are built to accommodate heavier loads and provide added durability.

Caravan Levelled On Sloping Ground

Caravan Levelled On Sloping Ground

How To Choose The Right Levelling Ramps For Your Caravan

  1. Consider Weight Capacity: Ensure the levelling ramps you choose can support the weight of your caravan.
  2. Check Compatibility: Check that the ramps are compatible with your caravan’s axle configuration. Make sure with dual axle caravans that the ramp will fit between the first and second wheel. Lots of ramps come in two sections for this reason.
  3. Look for Durability: Invest in quality levelling ramps made from sturdy materials to withstand rugged terrain.
  4. Wheel Chocks: Look for caravan levelling ramps that include working wheel chocks. No point in getting everything level only to have it roll back off the ramps.
  5. Consider Additional Features: Look for ramps with anti-slip surfaces and safety features for added peace of mind.

Jockey Wheel Used In Conjuction With Caravan Levelling Ramps

Jockey Wheel Used In Conjuction With Caravan Levelling Ramps

Tips for Using Caravan Levelling Ramps Effectively

  1. Assess the Slope: Before setting up, assess the slope of the ground and determine the low side. Pay consideration to whether your ramps have enough height to provide required levelling.
    Position Ramps Correctly: Position the levelling ramps perpendicular to the direction of travel and drive onto them slowly and steadily.
    Secure Placement: Engage the handbrake and chock the wheels on both sides to prevent any movement.
    Use A Shovel: A shovel can be just as effective as ramps. For example if your ramps aren’t high enough to provide the levelling you need you can dig out under the wheels on the opposite side to the ramps for additional height adjustment.

eLam Level Screenshot

eLam Level Screenshot

The eLam Level App​

The developers of the eLam level app and levelling device idea came up after many family camping trips over the years. Finding a level spot to park the camper trailer or caravan can be a tedious guessing game. They developed the eLam app to save time setting up so you can focus on what matters. The portable levelling device connects to the app displaying clear calculations which detect level ground that suits your caravan and maximum caravan levelling ramp height.

Setting Up, Installing & Using The eLam Level App​

Setup and installation is easy and takes less than ten minutes and you only need to do it once – unless you changed caravans then you’d just do it again. I’ll go through it for you step by step. In certain instances it doesn’t matter if you do it in a slightly different order. It literally takes longer to read the below than it does to do.

eLam Level Installed In Internal Cupboard

eLam Level Installed In Internal Cupboard

Initial Setup

  1. Download the app to your phone from Google Play or the Apple App Store.
  2. Open the eLam Level app on your phone, select ‘Find Devices’ and connect to your device.
  3. Select the ‘Settings’ button on the bottom navigation bar and enter your measured Axle length and Jockey wheel to axel length (as shown on the diagrams). For dual axle caravans measure from the centre of the 2 wheels to the jockey wheel.
  4. Then select your closest ramp height and change any other setting to your preference.
  5. Before positioning the eLam Level device in your caravan with the double sided tape, ensure the following steps have been completed:
    1. Place the eLam Level device on a horizontal surface with the arrow facing towards the front of the van. We have installed ours on a shelf inside an internal cupboard at the front of our caravan where it’s easy to get to.
    2. Try different locations in your van for best connection (preferably as close as practical to the front of the van and higher up if possible).
    3. Reverse towing vehicle close to the draw bar and from the drivers seat open the app and check that it connects. If you have trouble connecting you can try different device positions in the van.

Calibrating The Device

  • Manually level your caravan or trailer using ramps or jack and the jockey wheel. Use whatever means necessary be it a spirit level, an app on your phone or the wife yelling at you when she reckons it’s level because we all know that when she says it’s level it’s level no matter what any other scientifically proven method says! Make sure you get it the way you want it to be because this is the “level setting” you’ll use from now on when levelling with the app. Don’t stress too much because if you need to change it later on just repeat this step.
  • Once level select the “Calibrate” button in the app. Wait until calibrated. That’s it. You’re done.

Levelling Your Van

  • Place your phone in a cradle on your car dash.
  • Select the “Start Levelling” button when ready to find the best camping position.
  • When the indicator is in the orange zone, you can place your ramp(s) on the lowest side of the van.
  • Move the van slowly up the ramp/s allowing time for the indicator to settle at different points.

About The eLam Level Device

  • Mount anywhere on a horizontal surface
  • No wiring required
  • 5+ year battery life (with moderate yearly use)
  • Uses 2 x CR2477 batteries
  • Bluetooth low-energy device
  • Low power consumption when On and not connected (30uA)
  • Extra-low power consumption when Off and not advertising (13uA)
  • IP67 waterproof
  • Dimensions 67mm x 41mm x 15mm
  • Colour led to indicate device status
  • Off – Red led flashes 3 times
  • On – Blue led flashes 4 times
  • Connected – Green LED stays on

The eLam Level App

There are two versions of the eLam Level App available.

eLam Level v1

  • Caravan and RV support
  • Connects to your eLam Level device
  • Quick setup
  • Accuracy to 0.1 degrees
  • Colour indication when within ramp height
  • Colour indication when level
  • Find level ground while driving
  • Configurable connection timeout
  • Save hitch angle when uncoupling
  • Can connect to multiple eLam devices
  • Supports metric and imperial measurements
  • Upgrade to eLam Level v2 with Cloud Support directly through the eLam Level app
  • v1 Price As Of 26.04.2024 $125 incl GST

eLam Level v2 with Cloud Support

  • Comes with the same features as the v1 model, with these additional features.
  • Saves your device settings in the cloud
  • Connect to your device from any Android or IOS device without losing your calibration or other settings
  • No need to recalibrate or update your settings when connecting from different devices
  • Support for device firmware upgrades
  • Save Home and Away hitch angles
  • Power of your device through the App
  • Future enhancements will be available in this model only
  • v2 Price As Of 26.04.2024 $165 incl GST

eLam Level App ​Specifications

  • The eLam Level app and bluetooth low energy leveling device enables you to level your caravan or trailer without continually having to leave your car to check if you are level.
  • Lets you know when you are parked in a position where you can place your wheel ramp and achieve a level position.
  • No wiring required.
  • Battery life 5 years .
  • Adjustable device connection timeout through the app for extended battery life.
  • Power supply: 2 x CR2477 button cell batteries
  • Place anywhere in your caravan or trailer on a horizontal surface.
  • IP67 waterproof ratting.
  • Save hitch detach angle for easy reconnection to towing vehicle.
  • Highly accurate to 0.1 degree.

​Conclusion: Improve Your Caravan Experience with Levelling Ramps & The eLam Level App

Investing in quality caravan levelling ramps is essential for ensuring stability and safety during your travels. By choosing the right ramps and using them effectively, you can enhance your caravan experience and enjoy peace of mind on every journey. Teaming up your caravan levelling ramps with the eLam portable levelling device makes it even faster and more accurate.

 

Projecta Inverter And Projecta Shunt Installation

Projecta Inverter And Projecta Shunt Installation

Projecta Inverter And Projecta Shunt Installation

We installed a Projecta Inverter and Projecta Shunt in our Jayco All-Terrain caravan. The Projecta gear we installed is of a very high quality and it works in very well with the Projecta battery management system that came installed in our caravan.

Why Did We Need To Install A Projecta Inverter In Our Caravan?

Amanda and I both work from home to varying degrees. Amanda works from home full time and has done so for the last 10 years or thereabouts. I work from home a few days a week. Often we will head off early to a camp site close to home on a Friday around midday and need to be able to log in and use our laptops and external monitors for a few hours after we get to camp. We also need to run a small printer/scanner to get our work done at times. Plus I often like to do a bit of blogging while out in the van. Having a small inverter lets us do all of this.

We’ve installed the Projecta ProWave 500w Pure Sine Wave inverter. It’s only small however it covers off everything we need to run. We’ve tested it with both laptops, two extra monitors and the printer all plugged in at the same time and it was only using a combined total of 265 watts so it came in comfortably under the inverters maximum output of 500 watts.

Projecta Intelli RV 500A External Current Shunt

Projecta Intelli RV 500A External Current Shunt

About The Projecta Shunt

  • PROJECTA has added a 500A external current shunt to its INTELLI-RV power management range, enabling accurate measuring of large power loads.
  • Rather than bypassing INTELLI-RV system with a direct battery connection, installers can now connect an inverter to the external shunt, which communicates with INTELLI-RV system.
  • All wiring and connectors for connecting to an INTELLI-RV management system are included in the kit.
  • The INTELLI-RV external current shunt is compatible with all PM2, PM3 and PM4 series systems, as well as AGM, GEL, wet and lithium batteries.
  • A connected inverter can produce inaccurate State of Charge (SOC) information on the INTELLI-RV remote monitoring LCD screens and smart phone app.
  • An inverter’s power draw is accurately represented and accounted for on displays when wired to the external shunt.
  • Installers can also use this 500A shunt to connect large DC-DC chargers to INTELLI-RV systems in addition to inverters.

About The Projecta Inverter We Installed

  • Projecta ProWave inverters feature a heavy duty design, increased capacity, added protection and come with a 3 year manufacturer’s warranty.
  • There are a variety of appliances that can be powered by the Projecta PW500, including 240 volt TVs, laptops, gaming consoles, bar refrigerators, chargers, and more.
  • By adding an optional remote head to your system, you can easily monitor the usage remotely from your inverter as well as turn it on or off.

12v 500w Pro Wave Pure Sine Wave Inverter

12v 500w Pro Wave Pure Sine Wave Inverter

Projecta Inverter And Projecta Shunt Installation

Installation was very easy. All up it took me about two hours from beginning to completion. I had to move one of the housings for one of our two lithium batteries underneath our Jayco All0Terrain caravans seats so that the inverter would fit in alongside. I just had to turn the battery box 90 degrees to make room. I make up a few new leads using 6B&S cable. That’s plenty thick enough for the current it needs to carry. Everything installed has had an appropriately sized midi fuse installed.

The shunt and inverter were both installed using the wiring diagrams provided. The remote control for the inverter was located above one of the seat cushions and the wiring for it was routed behind the cushion – nice and easy.

Projecta Intelli RV 500A External Current Shunt Installed

Projecta Intelli RV 500A External Current Shunt Installed

Shower Door Replaced With Shower Curtain Jayco Caravan

Shower Door Replaced With Shower Curtain Jayco Caravan

Shower Door Replaced With Shower Curtain Jayco Caravan

We removed the heavy shower door in our Jayco All Terrain 17.55-9.AT-MY22 poptop caravan and replaced it with a shower curtain. Amanda Sloane is a legend with a sewing machine and it ended up looking like it came from the factory that way.

It still uses the original top runner and has had velcro strips added to it so it fits exactly the same as the old top curtain did. We’re off to do about 3,000 km of dirt roads this year (again ????) and we were worried about the door jumping off it’s hinges like it did to us once before. Also Amanda is a clean freak and it was all but impossible to clean between the original door and the vanity. The door as removed weighed 16.5kg – it’s in the shed so we can always refit it in about 15 minutes if needed.

I removed the top part of the track that pokes out from the wall. With the screws that hold the long piece to the frame removed you can pull the track away from the wall and lift it and twist it to get to the back of it. I used aluminium rivets to put it back in place as I noticed a few of the original screws had already rattled a bit loose. There are just two little screws at the back the pokey out bit it holding it in place. In a couple of places I ran a little bead of silicone alongside the aluminium track where Jayco had missed it. The curtain we bought was 2000mm high. Amanda had to shorten it in height a little bit as it was too long. The bottom of the curtain we bought had some weights in the hem to make it hang nicely so rather than cut these off she doubled it up over itself to the right length so the weights were still at the bottom.

Shower Curtain Uses The Original Runner Setup Jayco

Shower Curtain Uses The Original Runner Setup Jayco

We bought the shower curtain online from Robert Green Collection. The curtain we bought was 2000mm high by 2000mm wide.

 

Shower Door Replaced With Shower Curtain Photo Gallery

The Ultimate Guide To State Forest Camping In NSW Australia

The Ultimate Guide To State Forest Camping In NSW Australia

The Ultimate Guide To State Forest Camping In NSW Australia

Hey there! Want to know all about state forest camping in New South Wales (NSW) State forests? Well you’re in luck because this guide has got you covered from top to bottom! We’re talking about where to camp, what facilities you’ll find, how much it’ll cost you (spoiler alert: free!) and all the rules to follow for a fun and safe time.

  • Facilities
    First off let’s chat about what you can expect in terms of camping facilities. Picture this: loads of camping spots nestled in State forests, some with spots for tents or caravans, fire pits for roasting marshmallows, and toilets for when nature calls. Oh, and did I mention the picnic areas with tables and BBQs? Yeah a lot of the sites have them too! Just remember to use the existing fire pits because that’s the way to go.
  • Cost
    Now let’s talk cost. How much is this gonna set you back? Well, guess what? Camping in NSW State forests won’t cost you a cent! That’s right it’s absolutely free! Gotta love that.
  • Rules
    But hold up as always there are some rules you have to follow. You can’t reserve or book camping spots and you can only stay for up to four weeks at a time. Keep an eye out for signs at campsites because sometimes they’ll have shorter stay limits. And always listen to the forest officers – they know what’s up.
  • Camp Fires
    Now about campfires. Most places won’t have firewood so it’s best to bring your own or a gas BBQ. And remember there are fire regulations to watch out for, especially during Total Fire Bans. If you see a bushfire dial triple zero (000) immediately. During summer, there might be Solid Fuel Fire Bans in effect, meaning no campfires or charcoal BBQs allowed. So pack those gas appliances and plan accordingly. And hey, always check for closures and notices before you head out on your trip.
  • Safety
    Before you hit the road, make sure you’ve checked out all the important safety info. And if you’re planning on having a fire, double-check for any total fire bans in the area. And hey, don’t forget to reach out for the latest information on where you’re headed.
  • Camping Spots
    Now, let’s talk camping spots. You can camp in pretty much all State forests except for Cumberland and Strickland State forests. But here’s the scoop: camping usually ain’t allowed in picnic areas, ‘cept for rest areas along major highways passing through State forests. Got it?
  • What Can You Do In NSW State Forests?
    Phew, that’s a lot of camping talk! But wait, there’s more! We’re talkin’ four-wheel driving, trail bike riding, hiking, bushwalking, mountain biking, fossicking, rock climbing – you name it, NSW State forests got it! Just make sure you’re playing by the rules, staying safe, and respecting the environment.
  • Dogs
    Oh, and if you’re bringing along your furry friend, no worries! NSW State forests are dog-friendly, so your furbaby (I hate the term furbaby but apparently I’m on my own there) can tag along for the adventure. Just remember to keep ’em on a leash, clean up after ’em, and be respectful of other campers.

So there you have it, friends and neighbours! A rundown of all the camping and outdoor fun you can have in NSW State forests. Now go on, grab your gear, grab your beer and get ready for an epic adventure in the great outdoors!

Random Campsite In Wingello State Forest

Random Campsite In Wingello State Forest

List Of State Forest Camping Sites In NSW

1. Bago State Forest

Includes: Paddy’s River Dam – Blowering Dam Foreshore (currently closed) – Hume and Hovell Walking track – Pilot Hill Arboretum – Paling Yards

Camping, picnicking and bushwalking are permitted in Bago State Forest. Dogs are welcome on a lead and horse riding is allowed on formed roads and fire trails. Four-wheel driving and trail bike riding are permitted but only on formed roads. Driving off-road and unauthorised track construction is not permitted. Access to the site is via 4WD in dry conditions only. Take all rubbish with you and leave no trace.

There are no toilet facilities at this site. If you do not have your own toilet, camp at one of the nearby sites that have toilet facilities. When planning your visit, make sure you know what fire ratings and bans apply. In summer periods, Forestry Corporation may declare a Solid Fuel Fire Ban, meaning no wood or charcoal fires can be lit at any time. When lighting a campfire, make sure you stick to the following rules: In picnic and camping areas, only light fires in existing fire places. No fires are permitted within pine plantation areas. Only use fallen wood to light your fire never attempt to cut standing timber, whether alive or dead. Before lighting a fire, make sure the surrounding area is clear of leaves and flammable material and always keep plenty ofwater handy in case of a stray spark. Never leave your fire unattended and fully extinguish your fire with water before leaving.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Foreshore Rd, Blowering, New South Wales
GPS: -35.540476°, 148.260035°
Pet Friendly: Yes

Yadboro State Forest Old Trestle Bridge

Yadboro State Forest Old Trestle Bridge

2. Barrington Tops State Forest (Manning River)

Includes: Manning River – Cobark Lookout

Access to Barrington Tops State Forest is via Gloucester or Scone. The Manning River runs through the forest. On the banks of the Manning River, this stunning camping and picnic area is popular with four-wheel-drive enthusiasts and freshwater fisherman. It’s nestled in cool highland forests and is perfect for a peaceful mountain getaway.

The Manning River camping and picnic areas were upgraded in 2017, with the new site now located next to Henry’s Bridge on Pheasants Creek Road. To help protect catchment/stream health, please take all rubbish with you when you leave.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Pheasant Creek Rd, Barrington Tops NSW 2422
GPS: -31.88120234794992, 151.51210752467628
Pet Friendly: Yes

3. Belanglo State Forest (Dalys Clearing)

Includes: Dalys Clearing

This free campground offers toilets. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Dalys Rd, Belanglo State Forest, New South Wales
GPS: -34.527643°, 150.241341°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/belanglo
Pet Friendly: Yes

4. Bodalla State Forest (Bodalla Forest Rest Area)

Includes: Bodalla Forest Rest Area – Kianga Rainforest Walk – Wagonga Scenic Drive

Bodalla Forest Rest Area is located in Bodalla State Forest, just off the Princes Highway. This free campground offers toilets, picnic tables, drinking water and a book exchange. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed. The shaded area is nestled under tall spotted gums, with a easy walking trail around Mummaga Lake from which you may spot a variety or native animals and birds.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Bodalla Park Rd, Bodalla, New South Wales
GPS: -36.151320°, 150.095116°-36.151320°, 150.095116°
Phone: 1300 655 687
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/bodalla
Email: [email protected]
Pet Friendly: Yes

Yadboro State Forest Camping

Yadboro State Forest Camping

5. Bondi State Forest (Bondi Forest Lodge)

Includes: Bondi Forest Lodge

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Unnamed Road, Rockton NSW 2632
GPS: -37.18646690375689, 149.29029090616655
Pet Friendly: Yes

6. Boonoo State Forest

Includes: Basket Swamp visitor area – Basket Swamp Falls

Campground accessed via Basket Swamp National Park but is located in Boonoo State Forest. This free campground offers one long drop toilet. Dogs are permitted as campground is in State Forest (just be sure not to walk your dog in the National Park section).

  • 4WD is required to access this site.
  • It is accessible to camper trailers and off road caravans.
  • Camping in tents is allowed.
  • Road is dirt and maybe slippery when wet as area is swampy.
  • Road is narrow so beware if oncoming vehicles, particularly if towing.
  • No rubbish bins and no phone signal.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Boonoo State Forest, New South Wales
GPS: -28.910180°, 152.153782°
Phone: (02) 6736 4298
Pet Friendly: Yes

7. Bulahdelah State Forest

Bulahdelah Mountain is a legislated Aboriginal Place in recognition of the cultural, spiritual and historical significance of the area to the Worimi People. Worimi People are the traditional custodians of this country. Please respect Country and enjoy this beautiful place. Read more about the significance of Bulahdelah Mountain to the Worimi People.

The mountain landscape is unique, with towering Blackbutt, spectacular Grass Trees and contrasting alunite geological features. The walking tracks start at the base of the mountain.

  • Boolah-Dillah Track: 2.2km return takes you to the Worimi Cultural Area.
  • Mountain Track (1.7km return): starts from the Worimi Cultural Area and takes you to Mountain lookout.
  • Ted Baker Track (840m return): starts along the Boolah-Dillah Track.
  • Download the site map.
  • Caution – Lookouts are natural rock cliffs with no barriers or viewing platforms. Please take caution when walking with young children or anyone who might need assistance.
  • Caution – The mountain contains old mine sites, so please keep to formed walking tracks and avoid tunnels or loose edges.

The mountain was mined for its alunite. You can observe some of the old mining boilers, tram tracks, mullock heaps along the walks. To learn more, visit Bulahdelah Mountain Park, which is located at the base of the mountain. Toilets are also located there.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Pacific Hwy, Bulahdelah NSW 2423
GPS: -32.40791009139656, 152.22272522111493
Pet Friendly: Yes

Yadboro Flat Camping

Yadboro Flat Camping

8. Campbells Island State Forest

Includes: Campbells Island

Camping areas at various locations along the Murray and Little Murray Rivers.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Murrabit VIC 3579
GPS: -35.51140856981758, 143.94973744837247
Pet Friendly: Yes

9. Chichester State Forest (Allyn River)

Includes: Allyn River Forest Rest Area – Peach Tree – White Rock – Old Camp – Mount Allyn – Ladies Well – Dobbie Rim – Pademelon – Allyn River Rainforest Walking Track

Located in Chichester State Forest, Old Camp is positioned closest to the Allyn River with drive-in shady and spacious camp sites. A popular spot with families. Toilet facilities are provided. Dogs are permitted.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Allyn River Rd, Upper Allyn, New South Wales
GPS: -32.155619°, 151.488603°
Phone: 0130 065 568
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/chichester
Email: [email protected]
Pet Friendly: Yes

10. Chichester State Forest (Telegherry River)

Includes: Telegherry Forest Park – Frying Pan Creek – Currawong Camping Area – Coachwood Camping Area

On the way to Telegherry Forest Rest Area you will find a small, open air museum of old logging machinery. This is an excellent reminder of how logging equipment and practices have advanced over time. Telegherry Forest Rest Area contains separate picnic and camping areas beside the river. There are a number of short walking tracks leading into the surrounding forest and areas of river/creek that are popular spots on a hot day.

For visitor safety and protection of the environment, please note that following wet weather Telegherry may be closed to the public andthe gate will be locked.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Middle Ridge Rd, Upper Karuah River, New South Wales
GPS: -32.221114°, 151.745442°
Phone: (02) 9872 0111 or 1300 655 687
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/chichester-telegherry
Email: [email protected]
Pet Friendly: Yes

11. Coopernook State Forest (The Forest Headquarters)

Includes: Coopernook Forest HQ

The Forest Headquarters is just north of Coopernook (beoveen Taree and Kew). It is a lovely spot for a family picnic or overnight stay in scenic eucalypt forest. Caravans and campervans are welcome but no power available.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Bangalow Rd, Coopernook, New South Wales
GPS: -31.788881°, 152.608581°
Phone: (02) 9871 3377
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/coopernook
Pet Friendly: Yes

Wingello State Forest Camping Ripper Of A Camp Site

Wingello State Forest Camping Ripper Of A Camp Site

11. Dog Rocks State Forest (Campbells River)

Includes: Campbells River

It is accessible to camper trailers. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Swallows Nest Rd, Mount David, New South Wales
GPS: -33.785820°, 149.609451°
Pet Friendly: Yes

12. East Boyd State Forest (Scrubby Creek Rest Area)

Includes: Edrom Lodge – Scrubby Creek Rest Area

An attractive picnic area set on the banks ofthe Imlay Creek in Timbillica State Forests, around 1 Okm from the Princes Highway via Imlay Road. There is a popular swimming hole in granite boulders about 50 metres downstream from the picnic site. Facilities include toilets, picnic tables and fire pits. Pets are permitted.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Princes Highway, New South Wales
GPS: -37.222069°, 149.830303°
Pet Friendly: Yes

13. Ellangowan State Forest (Braemar Roadside Rest Area)

Includes: Braemar Roadside Rest Area

Basic facilities in roadside rest area on the Summerland Way, about 30 kilometres south of Casino, in Ellangowan State Forest. The site is suitable for tents, motorhomes, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Facilities include drop toilets, picnic tables, rubbish bins and fire pits. Pets are permitted.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Summerland Way, Rappville, New South Wales
GPS: -29.088060°, 153.001973°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/ellangowan
Pet Friendly: Yes

14. Girard State Forest (Crooked Creek Picnic Area)

Includes: Crooked Creek Picnic Area

Located about 500 metres from the Bruxner Highway in the Girard State Forest, this lovely natural clearing beside Crooked Creek provides for a convenient overnight or short stay camping. Facilities include toilets, picnic tables, walking tracks, 4WD tracks and fire pits. Pets are permitted.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Crooked Creek Fire Trail, Sandy Hill, New South Wales
GPS: -28.926982°, 152.312500°
Web: https://www.forests.nsw.gov.au/visiting/forests/girard
Pet Friendly: Yes

Wingello State Forest Camping

Wingello State Forest Camping

15. Hampton State Forest (Millionth Acre Recreation Area)

Includes: Millionth Acre

This free campground offers toilets. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Duckmaloi Rd, Hampton, New South Wales
GPS: -33.676944°, 150.050272°
Pet Friendly: Yes

16. Heaton State Forest (Watagan HQ Camping Area)

Includes: Heaton Forest Park – Heaton Lookout – Hunter Lookout – Mcleans Lookout – Watagan Headquarters

This is a free campground. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, RVs, camper trailers and caravans. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Watagan Forest Rd, Olney, New South Wales
GPS: -32.975802°, 151.412148°
Pet Friendly: Yes

17. Kerewong State Forest (Swans Crossing)

Includes: Longworth’s Tramline – Swans Crossing

About a 20 minute drive from Kew (halfway between Taree and Kempsey) is Swans Crossing. Popular with locals and visitors alike, this camping and picnic area in Kerewong State Forest is set on former farmland. The Swan family ran a dairy and beef property on the site for many years, including clearing the forest and establishing grasses for the stock. This continued until 1964 when the area became State forest and was regenerated as native forest including hardwood plantation areas.

  • No longer closed on weekdays (previously was due to logging operations).
  • Swimming is a popular activity in the nearby shallows of Upsalls Creek.
  • Longworths Tramway Heritage Walk is located a short drive away, with other walking tracks leading off from the site including Cascade Walking Track.
  • Tents, camper trailers, caravans and camper vans are welcome at Swans Crossing.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Kerewong Rd, Swans Crossing, New South Wales
GPS: -31.608745°, 152.581787°
Phone: (02) 6585 3744
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/kerewong
Pet Friendly: Yes

18. Koondrook State Forest

Includes: Koondrook State Forest

At various locations along the Murray River. There are many sites suitable for camping.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
GPS: -35.66800670000439, 144.246664668354
Phone: (02) 9872 0111
Pet Friendly: Yes

19. Mount Boss State Forest (Wild Bull Camping Area)

Includes: Cobrabald – Wild Bull – Pappinbarra Field Studies Centre – Cobrabald – The Bluff

This free campground offers toilets and swimming. It is dog friendly. Camping in tents is allowed. Room and access for camper trailers and small caravans

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Cobrabald Rd, Kippara, New South Wales
GPS: -31.245876°, 152.513164°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/mount-boss
Pet Friendly: Yes

Walking In Wingello State Forest

Walking In Wingello State Forest

20. Nalbaugh State Forest (Nalbaugh Falls)

Includes: Nalbaugh Falls

Type: State Forest Free Camping
GPS: -31.23992690611348, 146.91757958395064
Phone: (02) 9872 0111
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/nalbaugh-state-forest
Pet Friendly: Yes

21. Olney State Forest (The Basin Campground)

Includes: Abbotts Falls – Casuarina – Rock Lily – The Basin – The Pines Camping Area – The Pines Walking Trail – The Pines Picnic Area – Turpentine – Old Mill Picnic Area – Olney Headquarters

Located in the Olney State Forest the Basin Campground features open grassy camp sites with easy access and a flowing creek nearby. Located away and further inland of The Pines, Turpentine & Casuarina camping areas, the Basin is suitable for large groups. Nearby creeks can be used for swimming in the warmer months. The Great North Walk passes by this camping and picnic area.

Facilities include toilets, picnic tables and fire pits. State forests permit dogs, but visitors should keep them under control and on a lead at all times.

Please dispose of rubbish properly. Use rubbish bins if provided or take it with you. Choose a campsite carefully, at least 20 metres from the edge of any stream or waterway. Use existing areas for camping and do not clear or damage trees and plants. Do not cut standing timber, alive or dead, for firewood.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Basin Forest Rd, Olney, New South Wales
GPS: -33.104476°, 151.230474°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/olney
Pet Friendly: Yes

Walking In Belanglo State Forest

Walking In Belanglo State Forest

22. Penrose State Forest (Kingsbury VC Rest Area)

Includes: Kingsbury VC Rest Area

This is an ideal place to camp alongside for an overnighter on the Hume Highway between Sydney and Canberra.

This free campground is located in the Penrose State Forest and offers toilets, bins and picnic tables. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. You can stay here for up to 24 hours. Fire is allowed when not total fire ban. The noise ofthe highway is quite loud.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Stingray Road, Penrose, New South Wales
GPS: -34.619317°, 150.213856°
Pet Friendly: Yes

23. Perricoota State Forest (Perricoota State Forest Bush Camping)

Includes: Perricoota

This free campground offers swimming. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Freemans Rd, Womboota, New South Wales
GPS: -35.940171°, 144.479270°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/perricoota
Pet Friendly: Yes

24. Stewarts Brook State Forest

Includes: Moonan Brook Forestry Cottage – Moonan Outlook – The Firs Picnic Area

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Stewarts Brook NSW 2337
GPS: -31.93137288282747, 151.36193641023226
Phone: 0298720111
Pet Friendly: Yes

25. Styx River State Forest (Wattle Flat Camping Area)

Includes: Wattle Flat Picnic Area – Wattle Flat Camping Area

Bush camping beside the Styx River in the Styx River State Forest. Facilities include toilets, picnic tables and BBQ. The forest can be accessed via the Armidale-Kempsey Road. Turn north onto Styx River Forest Way and follow directional signage. Access for two wheel drives not recommended. Caravans and campervans are welcome, but only four wheel drives. No power is available.

Choose a campsite carefully, at least 20 metres from the edge of any stream or waterway. Use existing areas for camping and do not clear or damage trees and plants. Use soaps or detergents at least 50 metres from waterways and camping areas. Detergents, toothpaste and soap (even biodegradable) harm fish and aquatic life. Take all rubbish with you and leave no trace. State forests permit dogs, but visitors should keep them under control and on a lead at all times.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Boundary Rd, Armidale Region, New South Wales
GPS: -30.584152°, 152.200199°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/styx-river
Pet Friendly: Yes

State Forest Camping In Penrose State Forest

State Forest Camping In Penrose State Forest

26. Sunny Corner State Forest

Includes: Mary’s Park – Sunny Corner Arboretum – Sunny Corner

This site is located in Sunny Corner State Forest. No facilities are provided so please abide by minimal impact principles. Take all rubbish with you and leave no trace.

  • There is a drop toilet at this site and a fire pit
  • No water is available
  • Play ground for small children
  • Pets are permitted

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Sunny Corner Road, Sunny Corner, New South Wales
GPS: -33.387867°, 149.892964°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/sunny-corner-state-forest
Pet Friendly: Yes

27. Tallaganda State Forest (Lowden Forest Park)

Includes: Fern Gully Walking Trail – Hopkin’s Pond – Lowden Forest Park – Tallaganda Forest Drive

This free campground offers toilets. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Tallaganda State Forest, New South Wales
GPS: -35.509774°, 149.602694°
Pet Friendly: Yes

28. Urbenville State Forest (Urbenville Forest Park)

Includes: Urbenville Forest Park

Free picnic and camping ground in forest park on town boundary. Grassy and flat camping are with toilets, picnic tables and BBQ’s. Take all rubbish with you and leave no trace. Use existing areas for camping and do not clear or damage trees and plants. Do not cut standing timber, alive or dead, for firewood. State forests permit dogs but visitors should keep them under control and on a lead at all times.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Clarence Way, Urbenville, New South Wales
GPS: -28.468365°, 152.548682°
Phone: (02) 6634-1254
Web: https://www.forests.nsw.gov.au/visiting/forests/urbenville
Pet Friendly: Yes

29. Vittoria State Forest (Macquarie Woods Rec Area)

Includes: Macquarie Woods

This relatively unknown treasure offers picnicking and camping areas, walking tracks and a lookout with extensive views of the Macquarie Valley. Macquarie Woods is situated on the Mitchell Highway about halfiway between Bathurst and Orange. Macquarie Woods covers an area of 600 hectares and was established in 1988 as a demonstration forest. It displays exotic conifer planted forests and has an area of native woodland which once dominated the landscape. This is made up of yellow box, Blakelys red gum, red stringybark and apple box and other eucalypts in an expanse of native grass.

A large picnic area situated in the middle of the Forest with a camping area, toilets and information shelter completes the site. There are no camping fees and dogs are permitted. Solid fuel fires are not permitted. Fine of $2200 apply.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Cashens Lane, Vittoria, New South Wales
GPS: -33.408018°, 149.312622°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/vittoria-state-forest
Pet Friendly: Yes

Penrose Forest NSW State forest Camping

Penrose Forest NSW State forest Camping

30. Vulcan State Forest (Vulcan State Forest at Shooters Hill)

Includes: Black Springs

Dispersed forest camping sites in Vulcan State Forest just off Riverview Forest Road near Shooters Hill. No amenities or facilities. Multiple separated sites available. Established fire pits and grassy areas to camp. Basic state forest camping. Take all rubbish with you.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Riverview Forest Road, New South Wales
GPS: -33.886148°, 149.845463°
Web: https://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/vulcan-state-forest
Pet Friendly: Yes

31. Wild Cattle Creek State Forest (Mobong Creek)

Includes: Mobong Creek

This free campground offers toilets and swimming. It is dog friendly. Camping in tents is allowed. Only one flat camp site. Do not attempt if it’s due to rain. 4wd only. Road in is only partially sealed and has large pot holes.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Moses Creek Rd,, New South Wales
GPS: -30.218611°, 152.779190°
Pet Friendly: Yes

32. Wingello State Forest (Wingello HQ Camp)

Includes: HQ Camp

We’ve camped here loads of times and it’s pretty awesome. Besides the main camping area there are lots and lots of great sites dispersed all through the area.

HQ Camp is a free campground with toilets. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, RVs, camper trailers, caravans and big rigs. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Caroua Road Wingello, New South Wales
GPS: -34.715833°, 150.189104°
Pet Friendly: Yes

Dalys Clearing Camping In Belanglo State Forest

Dalys Clearing Camping In Belanglo State Forest

33. Yadboro State Forest (Yadboro Flat)

Includes: Yadboro Flat

This free campground offers toilets and swimming. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to camper trailers. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Yadboro State Forest, New South Wales
GPS: -35.340331°, 150.217275°
Web: http://www.forestrycorporation.com.au/visit/forests/yadboro
Pet Friendly: Yes

34. Yambulla State Forest (Newtons Crossing Camp)

Includes: Newton’s Crossing – Allan Brook

This free campground offers toilets and swimming. It is dog friendly. It is accessible to motorbikes, camper trailers and caravans. Camping in tents is allowed.

Type: State Forest Free Camping
Location: Allan Brook Rd, Yambulla, New South Wales
GPS: -37.267390°, 149.674800°
Pet Friendly: Yes

Four Wheel Driving And Trail Bike Riding In State Forest

Roaming Roads In NSW State Forests

Forestry Corporation maintains a sprawling network of roads and fire trails across its forests. These roads serve practical purposes, facilitating timber harvesting and protecting forests from summer bushfires. But they also grant community access to the forests, whether for tourism, recreation, or exploring the great outdoors with four-wheel drives or trail bikes.

Rules Of The Road

When it comes to State forest roads, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Normal road rules apply: Just like on regular roads, State forest roads have rules that everyone must follow.
  • Licencing and registration: Drivers and riders need to have the necessary licences, and vehicles, including motorcycles, must be registered and display clear registration plates.
  • Safety first: Riders must wear appropriate safety gear as required by law.
  • Stay on designated paths: Vehicles, including trail bikes and 4WDs, are only allowed on established roads, formed vehicle trails, and fire trails. Creating new tracks or bush bashing is a no-go.
  • Obey signage and directions: Follow any signs, directions, or gates to protect sensitive areas, respect adjacent private properties, and ensure everyone’s safety.
  • Exceptions: Remember, Cumberland State Forest doesn’t allow camping, trail bike riding, or 4WDing.

Protecting Our Roads

With 60,000 km of forest roads in NSW State Forests, it’s crucial to preserve them:

  • Drive responsibly: Avoid driving in wet conditions to prevent road damage and environmental harm.
  • Respect others: Slow down and show consideration for all road users, including trucks, vehicles, runners, cyclists, and horse riders.

Unacceptable Behaviour

Certain behaviours are strictly prohibited in State forests:

  • Damaging roads, infrastructure, or the environment
  • Creating new trails or driving off formed roads for thrills
  • Engaging in reckless driving practices

NSW And Act 4wd Association

Forestry Corporation collaborates with the NSW ACT 4WD Association to ensure responsible off-road activities. Affiliated 4WD Clubs can organise events in State forests, adhering to the Association’s 4WD Code of Conduct.

Safety Reminders

Driving In State Forests Requires Caution

  • Roads may be narrow, winding, and unsealed, with limited maintenance.
  • Plan your journey, check the weather forecast, and be prepared for various conditions.
  • Keep an eye out for other vehicles and heavy equipment like trucks and excavators, especially in remote areas with poor mobile phone reception.

So, next time you hit the road in a NSW State forest, remember to drive responsibly and enjoy the journey!

Hiking And Bushwalking

Explore NSW State Forests: Your Adventure Awaits!

Get ready for an unforgettable adventure in the NSW State forests! With a plethora of captivating walking and hiking trails boasting breathtaking scenery and natural wonders, there’s something for everyone to enjoy.
From short strolls spanning a few hundred metres to epic treks covering hundreds of kilometres, the trails offer varying levels of difficulty to cater to all skill levels and preferences.
Embark on renowned walks like the Great North Walk, stretching from Sydney to Newcastle, or tackle the challenging Six Foot Track in the majestic Blue Mountains, both of which traverse State forests, adding an extra layer of allure to your journey.

Before setting off on your expedition, it’s essential to be well-prepared:

  • Familiarise yourself with important safety information for visiting state forests to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.
  • Plan your trip meticulously, never venture alone, and always inform someone trustworthy of your whereabouts for added security.
  • Keep in mind that permits from the Forestry Corporation are mandatory for commercial activities and most organised events in State forests, so be sure to obtain them beforehand.

With these preparations in place, you’re all set to embark on an incredible journey through the captivating landscapes of NSW State forests. Let the adventure begin!

Where Can I Go Hiking And Bushwalking In NSW State Forests?

  • Armidale State Forest
    Includes: Armidale Forest Park
  • Awaba State Forest
    Includes: Deltaforce Paintball
  • Bagawa State Forest
    Includes: Twelve Sixty Flora Reserve
  • Bago State Forest
    Includes: Paddy’s River Dam; Blowering Dam Foreshore (currently closed); Hume and Hovell Walking track; Pilot Hill Arboretum; Paling Yards
  • Bodalla State Forest
    Includes: Bodalla Forest Rest Area; Kianga Rainforest Walk; Wagonga Scenic Drive
  • Bondi State Forest
    Includes: Bondi Forest Lodge
  • Boonoo State Forest
    Includes: Basket Swamp visitor area; Basket Swamp Falls
  • Bulahdelah State ForestBurrawan State Forest
    Includes: Burrawan Picnic Area; Old Bottlebutt
  • Campbells Island State Forest
    Includes: Campbells Island
  • Chichester State Forest (Allyn River)
    Includes: Allyn River Forest Rest Area; Peach Tree; White Rock; Old Camp; Mount Allyn; Ladies Well; Dobbie Rim; Pademelon; Allyn River Rainforest Walking Track
  • Chichester State Forest (Telegherry River)
    Includes: Telegherry Forest Park; Frying Pan Creek; Currawong Camping Area; Coachwood Camping Area
  • Cowarra State ForestCumberland State Forest
    Includes: Calgaroo Picnic Area; Shepherds Picnic Area; Swains Picnic Area; Bellamy Picnic Area
  • Girard State Forest
    Includes: Crooked Creek Picnic area
  • Glenwood State Forest
    Includes: Mountain Biking in Glenwood State Forest
  • Gurnang State Forest
    Includes: Bicentennial Trail
  • Heaton State Forest
    Includes: Heaton Forest Park; Heaton Lookout; Hunter Lookout; Mcleans Lookout; Watagan Headquarters
  • Kerewong State Forest
    Includes: Longworth’s Tramline; Swans Crossing
  • Koondrook State Forest
    Includes: Koondrook State Forest
  • Lidsdale State Forest
    Includes: Mountain Biking in Lidsdale State Forest
  • Mannus State Forest
    Includes: Mannus Lake
  • Micalong State Forest
    Includes: Micalong Swamp
  • Mundaroo State Forest
    Includes: Maginnity’s Historical Walking Trail; Hume and Hovell Walking track
  • Olney State Forest
    Includes: Abbotts Falls; Casuarina; Rock Lily; The Basin; The Pines Camping Area; The Pines Walking Trail; The Pines Picnic Area; Turpentine; Old Mill Picnic Area; Olney Headquarters
  • Orara East State Forest
    Includes: Includes: Forest Sky Pier, Sealy Lookout, Korora Lookout, Halfway Picnic Point.; Sealy Lookout
  • Perricoota State Forest
    Includes: Perricoota
  • Stewarts Brook State Forest
    Includes: Moonan Brook Forestry Cottage; Moonan Outlook; The Firs Picnic Area
  • Strickland State Forest
    Includes: Arboretum trail; Banksia Picnic Area; Bellbird trail; Cabbage Tree Trail; Stoney Creek Trail; Strickland Falls Trail
  • Styx River State Forest
    Includes: Wattle Flat Picnic Area; Wattle Flat Camping Area
  • Sunny Corner State Forest
    Includes: Mary’s Park; Sunny Corner Arboretum
  • Tallaganda State Forest
    Includes: Fern Gully Walking Trail; Hopkin’s Pond; Lowden Forest Park; Tallaganda Forest Drive
  • Tumut State Forest
    Includes: Tumut Trail
  • Vittoria State Forest
    Includes: Macquarie Woods
  • Vulcan State Forest
    Includes: Black Springs
  • Wang Wauk State Forest
    Includes: Sam’s Camp; Wootton Historical Railway Walk; Trestle Bridge
  • Wild Cattle Creek State Forest
    Includes: Mobong Creek

Dalys Clearing Camping In Belanglo State Forest

Dalys Clearing Camping In Belanglo State Forest

Mountain Bike Riding In NSW State Forests

Mountain bikers get ready to pedal your way through the stunning NSW State forest, where an extensive network of roads offer some absolute ripper opportunities for both leisurely rides and tough as guts challenges.

Whether you’re seeking an easygoing track or craving an adrenaline-pumping adventure, the State forests of NSW have something for every rider.

Venture into Bondi State Forest near Bombala, where a well-developed network of trails awaits, promising an unforgettable biking experience amidst picturesque surroundings. Closer to Sydney, the Southern Highlands State forests beckon with their enchanting pine forests, inviting riders to explore their winding paths and discover hidden gems along the way.

But before you hit the trails, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Familiarise yourself with essential safety information for visiting state forests to ensure a smooth and secure biking experience.
  • Don’t forget that permits from Forestry Corporation are required for commercial activities and most organised events in State forests, so be sure to obtain them in advance.

With your bike tuned up and your spirit of adventure ignited, prepare to embark on an epic journey through the breathtaking landscapes of NSW State forests. Let the biking escapade begin!

Where Can I Go Mountain Bike Riding While State Forest Camping In NSW?

  • Armidale State Forest
    Includes: Armidale Forest Park
  • Bago State Forest
    Includes: Paddy’s River Dam; Blowering Dam Foreshore (currently closed); Hume and Hovell Walking track; Pilot Hill Arboretum; Paling Yards
  • Beaury State Forest
    Includes: Tooloom Forest Drive
  • Bermagui State Forest
    Includes: Bermagui Picnic Area
  • Bodalla State Forest
    Includes: Bodalla Forest Rest Area; Kianga Rainforest Walk; Wagonga Scenic Drive
  • Bondi State Forest
    Includes: Bondi Forest Lodge
  • Boyne State Forest
    Includes: Big Bit Lookout
  • Clyde State Forest
    Includes: Mogood Lookout
  • Ellangowan State Forest
    Includes: Braemar roadside rest area
  • Girard State Forest
    Includes: Crooked Creek Picnic area
  • Glenwood State Forest
    Includes: Mountain Biking in Glenwood State Forest
  • Lidsdale State Forest
    Includes: Mountain Biking in Lidsdale State Forest
  • Nundle State Forest
    Includes: Nundle Forest Way; Ponderosa Park
  • Olney State Forest
    Includes: Abbotts Falls; Casuarina; Rock Lily; The Basin; The Pines Camping Area; The Pines Walking Trail; The Pines Picnic Area; Turpentine; Old Mill Picnic Area; Olney Headquarters
  • Orara East State Forest
    Includes: Includes: Forest Sky Pier, Sealy Lookout, Korora Lookout, Halfway Picnic Point.; Sealy Lookout
  • Ourimbah State Forest
    Includes: TreeTop Adventure Park; Dedicated mountain biking track
  • Toonumbar State Forest
    Includes: Toonumbar Forest Drive
  • Tumut State Forest
    Includes: Tumut Trail
  • Urbenville State Forest
    Includes: Urbenville Forest Park
  • Wingello State Forest
    Includes: HQ Camp

Fossicking While State Forest Camping In NSW

Hey there fellow fossickers! Did you know that you can embark on an exciting fossicking expedition right here in the NSW State forests? But before you grab your gear and head out let’s go over the details you need to know to keep yourself out of trouble.

Get Your Permit: Fossicking in State forests requires a permit, but don’t worry, it’s easy to obtain! Simply apply online through Forestry Corporation for a 12-month state-wide permit at just $27.50, including GST. With this permit, you’re all set for some small-scale fossicking fun for recreational, tourism, or educational purposes.

Family Fun: Planning to bring the whole crew along? No problem! A single permit can cover a family group of up to 5 people, including 2 adults and 3 children under 18 years of age. It’s a fantastic way to bond and create unforgettable memories together.

Group Gatherings: If you’re fossicking with a group or club, each member or family group must hold a permit. But here’s a tip: clubs can apply for a permit to cover single events through the Forest Permit – organised activities system.

Rules of the Hunt: While fossicking, it’s crucial to follow all regulations and guidelines, respecting the environment and fellow visitors. Remember, leave the forest just as beautiful as you found it. For more detailed information, be sure to check out “A Guide to Fossicking in New South Wales“.

Native Title Consideration: In areas where native title exists, ensure you obtain consent from the relevant registered native title body corporate before fossicking. You can find more information about Native Title on the National Native Title Tribunal website.

Map Your Journey: Before you set out, take a peek at the maps indicating where fossicking is permitted. Keep in mind that while every effort is made to ensure accuracy, State forests may close areas at short notice for operational or safety reasons.

Prepare and Explore: Apply for your fossicking permit, read up on the guidelines, and check out the maps to plan your adventure accordingly. Remember, fossicking is all about the small-scale search for minerals and gemstones using hand-held implements only. No fancy machinery allowed!

So, what are you waiting for? Grab your permit, gather your gear, and get ready to uncover hidden treasures in the breathtaking NSW State forests. Your fossicking adventure awaits!

Dogs And State Forest Camping In NSW

NSW State Forests Are Your Ideal Camping Destination With Your Furry Friend.

Planning a holiday with your beloved canine companion can often present challenges, especially when it comes to finding pet-friendly destinations. But did you know that in New South Wales (NSW), all State forests extend a warm welcome to your furry friend? Here’s why NSW State forests should be your next adventure spot with your loyal companion:

Welcoming Your Canine Friend

Unlike many other destinations, NSW State forests embrace the presence of dogs, ensuring that no member of your family is left behind. Whether you’re embarking on a hiking expedition or planning a camping getaway, your furry friend can join in on the fun without any hesitation.

Here Are Some Important Guidelines To Remember

To ensure a harmonious experience for everyone exploring NSW State forests, it’s essential to adhere to a few guidelines:

  • Control: Keep your dog under control at all times as per the responsibilities outlined in the Companion Animals Act 1998.
  • Cleanliness: Always pick up after your dog to maintain cleanliness and preserve the natural beauty of the forests.
  • Provision: Pack enough food and water for your dog, especially for long forest trips, to ensure their well-being throughout the journey.
  • Respect: Be mindful of fellow campers who may not have dogs and keep noise levels to a minimum, particularly during quiet hours.
  • Awareness: Stay within State forests as adjacent National Parks may have restrictions on dogs.

Additional Information About State Forest Camping In NSW With Your Dog

For further inquiries or assistance regarding your visit to NSW State forests with your furry friend, feel free to contact the Forestry Corporation:

  • Call the Forestry Corporation State-wide Information Line at 1300 655 687 or 02 9871 3377, Monday to Friday from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm.
  • Visit the Forestry Corporation Visitor Centre at 95 Castle Hill Road, West Pennant Hills NSW 2125.

Rock Climbing In NSW State Forests

Ready to conquer the heights and delve into the heart of NSW State forests? The Forestry Corporation extends a warm welcome to all responsible rock climbers and abseilers, offering a playground of natural wonders to explore. But before you gear up and hit the rocks, let’s go over a few ground rules to ensure a safe and respectful journey.

Excluded Areas

While most of our State forests are open for rock climbing and abseiling fun, there are a few exceptions. These areas are off-limits due to their sensitivity in terms of cultural heritage and environmental value, or because these activities clash with other forest happenings. Here are some spots you’ll need to steer clear of:

  1. Flora Reserves: Areas zoned as Forest Management Zone (FMZ) 1 are a no-go for climbing adventures. You can check out our online FMZ map for more details.
  2. Declared Aboriginal Places: Respect is key. Rock climbing and abseiling are not allowed in declared Aboriginal places within NSW State forests.
  3. Specific Forests: Certain State forests, like Biamanga in Mumbulla State Forest and Bulahdelah Mountain in Bulahdelah State Forest, are also excluded from these activities.

General Guidelines

Before you strap on your climbing shoes, keep these pointers in mind:

  • Check for Closures: Forest operations or timber harvesting might lead to temporary closures. Always obey signs and check for any additional restrictions.
  • Stay Updated: The excluded areas can change, so make sure to stay in the loop by checking our website regularly.

Camping In Wingello State Forest

Camping In Wingello State Forest

Climbing Conditions

Rock climbing and abseiling are thrilling adventures, but safety comes first. Here’s how you can make sure you’re climbing responsibly:

  • Protect the Environment: Watch out for sensitive plants and habitats, like orchids, cracks, and crevices where microbats and reptiles call home.
  • Minimise Damage: Be gentle with the rocks and avoid disturbing wildlife habitats. Try out different routes to spread out the wear and tear.
  • Respect Nature: Leave no trace behind. Minimise pathways and use natural features as anchor points. Permanent steel pegs are a no-no, but nuts or chocks are fair game.

So gear up, stay safe, and get ready for an adrenaline packed adventure rock climbing in the breathtaking NSW State forests!

Staying Safe

When visiting NSW State forests, it’s crucial to prioritise safety:

  1. In case of a bushfire emergency, call ‘000’ or visit www.rfs.nsw.gov.au for updates.
  2. Stay informed about Total Fire Bans and Current Fire Danger Maps at www.rfs.nsw.gov.au.
  3. For more information about emergency services, visit www.nsw.gov.au.

Australia Day Camping In Belanglo State Forest

Australia Day Camping In Belanglo State Forest

FAQs About Camping In NSW State Forests

How Much Does It Cost To Camp In NSW State Forests?

Guess what? Camping in State forests won't cost you a cent.

What facilities are there in State forests For State Forest Camping?

You can find loads of camping spots in State forests. Some have space for tents or caravans, fire pits, and toilets. Many of these forests even have picnic areas with tables and BBQs. Remember to use the existing fire pits whenever you can.

What Restrictions are there on NSW State Forest Camp Sites?

You can't reserve or book camping spots in State forests. And there's a limit to how long you can stay—usually four weeks tops. Keep an eye out for signs at campsites that might specify shorter stays, and make sure to follow any instructions from the forest officers.

Campfires And Firewood In NSW State Forests

Most places won't have firewood available, so it's best to bring your own or a gas BBQ. And watch out for fire regulations, especially during Total Fire Bans. If you spot a bushfire, dial triple zero (000) ASAP.During summer, Solid Fuel Fire Bans might be in effect in many State forests, meaning no campfires or charcoal BBQs allowed. Make sure to pack gas appliances and plan for days with total fire bans. Check for current closures and notices before your trip or reach out to your local Forestry Corporation office for the latest info.

What do I need to know before I go camping In NSW State Forests?

  • Check out important info about visiting State forests for safety tips and sustainable recreation
  • If you're thinking about having a fire, make sure there's no total fire ban in the area
  • Get in touch with us for the most up-to-date info on the area you're planning to visit

Where Abouts Can I Camp In A NSW State Forest?

You can camp in all State forests except for Cumberland and Strickland State forests. Just remember, camping usually isn't allowed in picnic areas. The exception? Rest areas along major highways passing through State forests.